But what does it mean? And what’s the response?

In my last post I responded to a rather bad exegesis of John 10:30-36 by Steve Hays, I say it’s bad with no disrespect, all trinitarians readings of this text are going to end up being bad exegesis. Steve has since replied to my response and I feel I would be remiss if I didn’t given his defense of his reading a good shot and a reply. So here it goes:

Some guy named Roman A. Montero–evidently a unitarian–attempted to respond on Tuggy’s behalf to a post of mine.

Not on Tuggy’s behalf, on my own behalf, I can only speak for myself.

Continue reading “But what does it mean? And what’s the response?”

Advertisements
But what does it mean? And what’s the response?

The God of Islam, the God of Judaism and the God of Christianity – Part 2

Continuing from the last post, we will now look at Nabeel Qureshi’s argument about supposed trends in First Century Judaism toward a Multi-personal God, if you haven’t read Part 1 of this series I suggest you do to get the context of what we are talking about. Nabeel Qureshi in his discussion with Miroslav Volf (at around the 28 minute mark) says:

The Orthodox Jews today do not reflect first century Hellenistic Judaism; they reflect rabbinic Judaism, which was formed from the late second century onward, from the time of Jesus that was Hellenistic Judaism a different kind of Judaism. In that time many Jews did believe in one being God with multiple persons. Now, I suggest that, for anyone who’s shocked by that statement they read the works of two Jewish scholars one is named Alan Segal he wrote a book called two powers in heaven and another by the name of Daniel Boyarin an orthodox Jew. Both of them argue that there were beliefs of plural personhood in a single being of God during that time of Hellenistic Judaism.

Continue reading “The God of Islam, the God of Judaism and the God of Christianity – Part 2”

The God of Islam, the God of Judaism and the God of Christianity – Part 2

The Riddles of John – Part 2, false tensions

In the previous Post I introduced and began to challenge an article by Paul Anderson discussing the alleged Riddles in John that in some way led up to the Trinity. Let’s move on to the idea that there are riddles within John. I don’t’ think there are, I think that John is actually quite clear in what he means as long as we don’t read into John later categories of thought. The first of the Johannian riddles posited in the article is about the divinity of Jesus, Anderson writes:

Is Jesus Human, Divine, or Both?

The question of Jesus’ humanity and divinity is more pronounced in John than any other single writing in the New Testament. Jesus is referred to as God, who was with God from the beginning—the very source of creation (Jn 1:1-2, 18), and yet the Word also became human flesh (1:14), and water and blood flowed forth from his side (19:34). The Johannine community attests having beheld his divine glory, and yet the eyewitness attests to having witnessed his fleshly humanity.

Continue reading “The Riddles of John – Part 2, false tensions”

The Riddles of John – Part 2, false tensions

Robert Bowman’s Anti-Trinitarian Theology Challenge – Part 2

Continuing with Robert Bowman’s Challenge to anti-Trinitarian theology, I will be dealing with his argument for proposition 4, the proposition that The Son, Jesus Christ, is God, the LORD. In the previous post I introduced the challenge, and gave some thoughts about Robert Bowman’s requirements for anti-Trinitarian theologians, then I addressed the first proposition, the proposition that there is one God, showing that the question cannot be put so simply, and that it assumes the false assumption that the word “god” is a specific category of being. For the sake of brevity and the need to focus on the real divisive issues, I’ll skip propositions 2 and 3 and move right on to proposition 4, since 2 and 3 are propositions I can readily affirm.

Proposition 4 is really 2 propositions, one that Jesus is God, which can mean more than one thing as we saw in the previous post, and two that Jesus is the LORD, that Jesus is Jehovah himself. Both Robert Bowman and myself admit the obvious fact that in various places Jesus is given the title of God, the question is what does that mean, we cannot assume that that title demands that Jesus is Jehovah, because we know in the old testament and the new that other beings who are not God are called Gods, and not just false Gods. Some of these verses are John 1:1, John 1:18, perhaps John 20:28 (but it’s not that clear if Jesus is actually being called God here). Then there are verses where it is claimed Jesus is being called God but in fact, it’s not that clear and in some cases clearly false, for example Acts 20:28, Hebrews 1:8, Titus 2:13, 2 Peter 1:1, 1 John 5:20, Romans 9:5 and so on. The number of verses that are at stake here don’t show anything in favour of anything until we actually look at what they say, the context they are in, and the larger picture. So let’s get into it.

Continue reading “Robert Bowman’s Anti-Trinitarian Theology Challenge – Part 2”

Robert Bowman’s Anti-Trinitarian Theology Challenge – Part 2

John 1:1, James White and Daniel Wallace sneaking theology into grammar

In a recent episode of the Dividing Line James White along with Daniel Wallace respond to some Muslim apologists who attack a Trinitarian reading of John 1:1, honestly some of the arguments given by those Muslim apologists are rather weak. However, the response by James White, and Daniel Wallace are also quite weak. Daniel Wallace quotes from his book Greek Grammar, Beyond the Basics. I’ll just take the quote and show why I think it’s problematic.

Daniel Wallace says:

Continue reading “John 1:1, James White and Daniel Wallace sneaking theology into grammar”

John 1:1, James White and Daniel Wallace sneaking theology into grammar

The Prologue of John, The Logos, The Creation, Philo and Wisdom – Part 4

This is the last post in the series;”The Prologue of John, The Logos, Creation, Philo and Wisdom.” In Part 1 we went over the text of the Prologue itself, showing that the Logos isn’t actually identified as God, but rather described as God, or Divine, also how all things came to be through the Word, not actually created by the Word. In Part 2 we discussed Philo and his Logos Theology, showing how it matches very well with John’s use of the term Logos, and how he pictures the Logos as a first-created Demiurge archangel through which all other creation was made. In Part 3 we looked as some ancient Jewish Wisdom literature pointing out parallels with both John’s and Philo’s Logos Theology.

Continue reading “The Prologue of John, The Logos, The Creation, Philo and Wisdom – Part 4”

The Prologue of John, The Logos, The Creation, Philo and Wisdom – Part 4

The Prologue of John, The Logos, The Creation, Philo and Wisdom – Part 3

In Part 3 of ”The Prologue of John, the Logos, The Creation, Philo and Wisdom,” we’ll be continuing from Part 1 and Part 2, this time talking about the Jewish wisdom literature, specifically Proverbs 8, The Wisdom of Solomon 7, and The Wisdom of Sirach 24. The reason for this is to show that the concept of “Wisdom” personified in these writings could be a source for the logos concept of Philo and John, or at least have influenced the “Logos” theology of Philo and John. Let’s start with Proverbs 8 (all quotations from the NRSV):

Continue reading “The Prologue of John, The Logos, The Creation, Philo and Wisdom – Part 3”

The Prologue of John, The Logos, The Creation, Philo and Wisdom – Part 3